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RI Archives: Rural Road Trips

View past Historic Homes, Museums and Gardens articles.

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Historic Homes, Museums & Gardens

Adams, MA
Susan B. Anthony Birthplace & Museum

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Montgomery Place
A 434-acre intact Hudson River Valley estate

Athens, NY

Howard Hall Farm a laboratory for restoration training

Austerlitz, NY

Old Austerlitz

Germantown, NY

Clermont an early Hudson River estate


Olana
Home of Hudson River School painter Frederic Church

Hudson, NY

The American Museum of Firefighting

Hyde Park, NY


Home of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt

The Vanderbilt Mansion relic of the Gilded Age

Kent, CT

Sloane Stanley Museum artist’s studio and tool collection

Kinderhook, NY

U. S. President Martin Van Buren house

Lenox, MA


The Mount Edith Wharton’s estate and gardens

Frelinghuysen Morris House & Studio Cubist paintings in a Modernist house

Ventfort Hall the Gilded Age Museum

New Lebanon, NY

Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Pittsfield, MA

Hancock Shaker Village

Arrowhead home of Herman Melville.

Rhinebeck, NY

Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome aircraft and auto museum; air shows


Wilderstein Historic Site elaborate Queen-Anne style house of the Suckleys. 

Poughkeepsie, NY

Locust Grove home of Samuel F.B. Morse

Sheffield, MA

Ashley House c. 1735 house; oldest in Berkshire County

Staatsburgh, NY

Mills Mansion house remodeled in Beaux Arts style by McKim, Mead & White

Stockbridge, MA

Chesterwood Estate & Museum home of Lincoln memorial sculptor Daniel Chester French

Mission House 1739 house with Colonial Revival garden


Naumkeag McKim, Mead & White summer cottage and gardens

Williamstown, MA

The Folly at Field Farm Modernist house and sculpture garden

[See more Historic Homes, Museums and Gardens articles]

Clermont’s ‘Wordscape’ Adds Literature To The Landscape

By Amy Krzanik

From published poets and writing teachers to elementary school students, a huge range of submissions have come in for Clermont Historic Site’s newest exhibit, Wordscape. Laminated words (poems, quotes and other writings) have been placed along Clermont’s woodland paths, lilac walk and garden for guests to peruse at their leisure.

“We’ve had professional artist exhibitions in the past, and will continue to do so, but last year’s Yarn Burst was the first one that allowed the community to feel like they could interact and make their mark here,” says Conrad Hanson, executive director of Friends of Clermont. “They really feel engaged with the site when they can contribute to a larger effort. We had 40 knitters for Yarn Burst, but we have 400 writers for Wordscape.”

Some of the 400 entrants include a New York City woman who submitted a chest of drawers with writing inside of it; the Benedictine Hospital oncology unit who wrote about when they were young and submitted it as one piece; Germantown Central School who sent in colorful, single-word signs from its students; and a couple who presented an entry from their daughter who passed away.

Because of unpredictable weather, Wordscape doesn’t have a set end date. Hanson expects the exhibit to last at least four weeks, depending on the whims of Mother Nature.

The Sunday, June 7th opening reception at 4 p.m. will feature local writers reading in the mansion, the recognition of outstanding writing submissions, and a wine and cheese celebration. Young poets will rap their work and a 90-something poet-artist will read from his latest book. It’s free and there will be food trucks and beverages available for purchase.

Wordscape Opening Event
Sunday, June 7 from 4-6 p.m.
Clermont Historic Site
87 Clermont Ave., Germantown, NY  
(518) 537-6622

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 06/01/15 at 03:42 PM • Permalink