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Spencertown Festival Of Books Turns The Page On Ten Years

David Highfill, Kimberly Rawson and Academy Board President Nick van Alstine at last year’s preview party.

By Amy Krzanik

Not just another used book sale, the Spencertown Festival of Books spans four days (September 4-7) and features award-winning and bestselling authors of fiction, history, memoir, food tomes, and young adult novels. It’s also a fine way to meet your neighbors – many of the featured speakers live right here in our area.

The festival, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary, began as a way to raise funds for the Spencertown Academy Arts Center’s community arts programs but has grown into a hotly anticipated event for all ages.

Those who want first dibs on the selection of more than 10,000 books will want to attend the Preview Party on Friday night from 6-8 p.m. On Saturday, younger children can visit with Corduroy Bear and teenagers will want to catch the award ceremony for the Festival’s first-ever teen short story contest. The three prize winners, all local, will be chosen at 11:45 a.m. and get a chance to read their stories for an audience.

David Highfill, an Academy board member and vice president and executive editor at publishing house William Morrow & Co., is co-chair of this year’s Festival. For the past five years he’s been involved in everything from the Festival’s programming to the sorting of its book donations. “It’s a bit like channeling your inner librarian,” he says about organizing the titles. 

Highfill is especially excited about Sunday’s event, “My Search Through History,” a discussion between bestselling author Simon Winchester and WAMC’s Alan Chartock. Although he’s a Sandisfield, Mass. resident, Winchester (The Professor and the Madman; Krakatoa; The Men Who United the States) is a popular speaker and this will be the first time he’s available to participate in the Festival. “I’m thrilled that he’s so excited to do it because I think he’s one of the great historians working today,” says Highfill. “He and Alan are friends, so it will be interesting to hear them in conversation.”

RI readers will recognize another familiar face when food writer extraordinaire Ruth Reichl and Luke Barr discuss “The Reinvention of American Taste” on Saturday. Reichl is revered by foodies, and Barr is the great nephew of M.F.K. Fisher and author of Provence, 1970: M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste, so there’s sure to be a lot to chew on in this conversation.

Also on Saturday, historian and Williamstown, Mass. resident Alex Kershaw will join historical novelists David R. Gillham (City of Women) and moderator Daphne Kalotay (Russian Winter; Sight Reading) to discuss “Heroes and Spies, Real and Imagined.” The three will explore the role of resisters during the WWII and share themes of courage and moral choices in occupied Paris and in Berlin.

Alex Kershaw, photo by Michael Carroll.

In Kershaw’s latest book, Avenue of Spies, the author delves into a story that proves that truth really is stranger than fiction. The work focuses on American physician Sumner Jackson and his wife and son, who, during WWII, lived in France on a street surrounded by some of the most evil figures of the day. Drawn into the resistance movement, Jackson smuggled fallen Allied fighter pilots safely out of France, right under the nose of his neighbors: a Nazi “mad sadist,” spy hunters, secret police and the Gestapo headquarters.

“The son is still alive, so I spent time with him and it became personal for me,” Kershaw says. “The family was amazingly courageous and they paid a very high price for it.”

Kershaw explains his participation in the Festival — and sums up how many book lovers feel — by saying, “A festival that brings a bunch of readers together is a good and rare thing, and I’ll do anything to help people enjoy books.”     

10th Annual Festival of Books
Friday, September 4 - Monday, September 7
Spencertown Academy Arts Center
790 Route 203, Spencertown, NY
(518) 392-3693

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 08/25/15 at 11:44 AM • Permalink